English | Spanish

Understanding the affordable care act

Información para comprender la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio

Glossary of Terms

Accountable care organization (ACO)

An accountable care organization (ACO) is a group of health care providers who can offer
Medicare patients coordinated, high-quality care. When an ACO delivers both high-quality care and efficient health care spending, it shares in the Medicare savings.

Accreditation

For the health insurance marketplace, accreditation means that a health plan has met national quality standards.

Actuarial value

An actuarial value is the percentage of total health care costs that are paid by a health insurance plan. For example, a plan with an actuarial value of 70% pays for 70% of all enrollees' combined health care costs. You would then be responsible for paying the other 30%, through a combination of copayments, deductibles, and coinsurance.

Actuarial equivalent

Actuarial equivalent is a term used to describe two or more health plans that have the same
actuarial value. Actuarially equivalent plans will likely have different premiums and cost-sharing requirements.

Affordable Care Act (ACA)

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly referred to as Obamacare, is the health care reform law enacted in March 2010 that will start to take effect in January 2014. The ACA helps put you in control of selecting and managing your insurance coverage. It includes reforms such as guaranteed coverage regardless of your health status.

Affordable coverage (for individuals and families)

Affordable coverage is a term that relates directly to the individual mandate. If you would have to spend more than 8% of your household income on insurance, there would be no fee if you decide to go without insurance.

Agent

Agents can help you through the complexities of purchasing and enrolling in health insurance coverage to get the best price based on specific situations and needs. Also, agents can act as advisors when you need help with claims processing. Agents are paid a commission for their work, and they are licensed and regulated by states.

Allowed amount

Allowed amount is the maximum amount an insurance company will pay for your covered health care services. If services cost more than the allowed amount, then you may have to pay the difference.

American Indian or Alaska Native

An American Indian or Alaska Native is someone from any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. American Indians and Alaska Natives are eligible for additional benefits under the
Affordable Care Act.

Annual deductible combined

Within a Health Savings Account (HSA), an annual deductible combined is the total amount you must pay out of pocket before the health plan begins to cover the costs.

Annual limit

An annual limit is a cap on the benefits your insurance company will pay toward services in a coverage year. It can be placed on the costs of a service or on the number of visits for a service. Once you reach your annual limit, your carrier will not cover additional services until the beginning of the next plan year.

Appeal

As it relates to a health insurance marketplace, an appeal is a request to review a decision made about your eligibility. An appeal can also be a request for your carrier to review a decision or grievance

Association health plan

An association health plan is a health insurance plan that is offered to members of an association. Depending on how an association health plan is structured, it could be largely exempt from regulations.

Authorized representative

An authorized representative is a person—such as a guardian or an individual who has power of attorney—who can help make decisions for you, including enrolling in a health coverage plan, handling claims and payments, and signing the application on your behalf.

Balance billing

Balance billing is when a provider bills you for the difference between their charge and the
allowed amount. For example, if the provider’s charge is $100 and the allowed amount is $70, the provider may bill you for the remaining $30.

Basic Health Program (BHP)

Under the Affordable Care Act, states have the option to implement a Basic Health Program (BHP) that would offer affordable insurance coverage for low-income residents. The program would provide continued care for people with incomes that move between Medicaid eligibility and eligibility for tax credits to get coverage through the state's health insurance marketplace.

Benefits

Benefits refer to health care services that are covered by your health plan.

Broker

Agents, sometimes referred to as brokers, can help you through the complexities of purchasing and enrolling in health insurance coverage to get the best price based on specific situations and needs. Also, agents can act as advisors when you need help with claims processing. Agents are paid a commission for their work, and they are licensed and regulated by states.

Capitation

A capitation is a method of paying for health care services where providers receive a set payment for each person instead of receiving payment based on the number of services provided or the costs of the services.

Carrier

A carrier is a licensed company that provides you with health and/or dental insurance coverage. A carrier may also be referred to as an "insurer" or "insurance company.

Case management

Case management is the process of coordinating medical care for patients with specific diagnoses or high health care needs. Case managers can be physicians, nurses, or social workers.

Catastrophic plan

Catastrophic plans are designed to provide you with an emergency safety net to protect against high, unexpected medical costs. Although these plans have lower monthly premiums, they require you to pay full price for most of your health care services until you reach your out-of-pocket limit. Catastrophic plans are only available if you are under 30 years old, or if you would have to spend more than 8% of your household income on a bronze plan.

Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) can provide health coverage for your children if they aren’t eligible for Medicaid, and if your family can’t afford private insurance. CHIP is administered by each state and jointly funded by the federal and state governments.

Chronic care management

Chronic care management is the coordination of both health care and supportive services to improve the health status of patients with chronic conditions, such as diabetes and asthma.

COBRA

COBRA is a type of continuation coverage that allows you to continue your health coverage offered through an employer, even if you have changed or lost a job, or experienced a change in your eligibility status.

Coinsurance

Coinsurance is a form of cost-sharing required by some insurance plans. Coinsurance is the percentage you would have to pay if you receive a covered health care service. If your insurance plan requires 20% coinsurance, you would pay 20% of the allowed amount for a covered health care service. The insurer would pay the rest of the allowed amount.

Community rating

Community rating is a method for setting premium rates for health insurance plans. With community rating, all enrollees of an insurance plan are charged the same premium regardless of their age, gender, or health status.

Consumer-directed health plan

A consumer-directed health plan helps increase awareness about health care costs and gives incentives for considering costs when making health care decisions. These health plans usually have a high deductible accompanied by a consumer-controlled savings account.

Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan (CO-OP)

A Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan (CO-OP) is a qualified health plan offered by nonprofit, customer-governed, private health insurers.

Continuation coverage

Continuation coverage allows you to temporarily continue your health coverage, even if you have changed or lost a job, or experienced a change in your eligibility status. See COBRA,
State Continuation, and portable coverage.

Coordinated care organization (CCO)

A coordinated care organization (CCO) is a network of health care providers who have agreed to work together in their local communities to serve Medicaid patients.

Copayment (copay)

Copayments are a form of cost-sharing required by some insurance plans. Also called a "copay," a copayment is a fixed dollar amount (e.g., $20) you would have to pay if you receive a covered health care service. Copayment amounts can vary depending on the type of service.

Cost-sharing

Cost-sharing refers to any expense you pay when you receive covered health care services. Cost-sharing can be in the form of deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance. These costs are above and beyond the amount you pay for your premium.

Cost-sharing assistance

Cost-sharing assistance lowers your out-of-pocket maximum and can also reduce your plan
deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance amounts.

Deductible

A deductible is a form of cost-sharing required by some insurance plans. A deductible is a fixed dollar amount (e.g., $500) you would have to pay for covered health care services before your insurance plan begins to pay for services. The deductible may not apply to all services.

Defined contribution

A defined contribution is a fixed dollar amount an employer pays toward the employee-only premium. It must be the same dollar amount for all employees.

Dependent

Dependents are typically family members. For tax purposes, dependents are people who qualify as an exemption on your tax return. For insurance purposes, dependents are any children up to the age of 26, who can remain on their parents' insurance plan.

Disability

A disability is a medical condition or impairment that limits the ability to perform normal work or life activities. Disabilities may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these.

Dual eligible beneficiaries

Dual eligible beneficiaries are individuals who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid.

Early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment (EPSDT) services

Early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment (EPSDT) services are some of the services states are required to include in their basic benefits package for all Medicaid-eligible children under age 21. EPSDT services include periodic screenings for physical and mental conditions, as well as vision, hearing, and dental problems.

Electronic health record

An electronic health record—or an electronic medical record—is a computerized record of your patient information, including medical, demographic, and administrative data.

Eligible dependent

Eligible dependents are spouses, domestic partners, or children who are eligible to enroll in the same plan as you are.

Eligible employee

For businesses, an eligible employee is someone who works a regular schedule of 17.5 hours or more per week on the date coverage is to take effect.

Employee participation rate

For businesses, an employee participation rate is the percentage of employees who enroll in an employer’s health coverage.

Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is a federal law that sets minimum standards for pension plans. ERISA applies to most kinds of employee benefit plans, including plans covering health care benefits.

Employer coverage

Employer coverage is the health coverage that a company provides you, and sometimes your spouses and children.

Employer Health Care Tax Credit

The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit was created under the Affordable Care Act to help encourage small businesses with fewer than 25 employees to offer group coverage. Small businesses must purchase a plan through the health insurance marketplace, and cover at least 50% of the cost of health coverage for each employee. The average annual salary of all employees is less than $50,000.

Employer mandate

For businesses, an employer mandate is a requirement for employers to offer health benefits and pay a set portion of the cost of those benefits on behalf of their employees. Mid-sized companies with the equivalent of 50 to 99 full-time employees have until 2016 to provide affordable coverage. Larger companies must offer insurance to at least 70% of full-time workers in 2015, and 95% beginning in 2016.

Enrollment period

An enrollment period is a defined period during which you may enroll in health insurance coverage.

Entitlement program

Entitlement programs refer to federal programs, including Medicare and Medicaid. If you're eligible for these programs you have a right to benefits.

Essential health benefits (EHB)

Essential health benefits are a set of 10 health care service categories defined by the
Affordable Care Act that must be covered by certain plans beginning in 2014.

Exchange

An exchange, sometimes called a health insurance marketplace, is a new way to get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Starting in 2014, every state will have a marketplace where you can compare and purchase health insurance plans, and find out if you are eligible for tax credits or public programs to help pay for your health care.

Excluded services

Excluded services are health care services that are not covered by a particular health insurance plan.

Exclusive Provider Organization (EPOs)

An Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) offers managed care plans that cover services only if you go to doctors, specialists, or hospitals in the plan’s network.

Experience rating

Experience rating is a method of setting premiums for health insurance policies based on the claims history of an individual or group.

Federal Employee Health Benefits Program (FEHBP)

The Federal Employee Health Benefits Program provides health insurance to employees of the U.S. federal government. Federal employees can choose from a menu of plans that include fee-for-service plans, plans with a point-of-service option, and health maintenance organization plans.

Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP)

The Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) is the statutory term for the federal
Medicaid matching rate. This percentage is the share of the costs of Medicaid services or administration that the federal government covers.

Federally recognized Tribe

Federally recognized Tribes are American Indian or Alaska Native Tribes legally acknowledged by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Federal poverty level (FPL)

The federal poverty level (FPL) is the federal government's working definition of poverty that is used to determine whose income is below poverty and who is eligible for public programs.

Federally qualified health centers (FQHC)

Funded by the federal government, federally qualified health centers (FQHC) refer to safety net service providers—such as community health clinics and public housing centers—that provide health services regardless of your ability to pay.

Fee

Starting January 1, 2014, if you don't have a health plan that qualifies as minimum essential coverage, you may have to pay a fee that increases every year: from 1% of income (or $95 per adult, whichever is higher) in 2014 to 2.5% of income (or $695 per adult) in 2016.

Fee-for-service

Fee-for-service is a traditional method of paying for medical services under which doctors and hospitals are paid for each service they provide.

Grandfathered health plan

A grandfathered health plan is a group health plan that was created—or an individual health insurance policy that was purchased—on or before March 23, 2010. Grandfathered plans are exempt from many changes required under the Affordable Care Act.

Group health insurance

Group health insurance is offered to a group of people, such as employees of a company. A large number of Americans have group health insurance through their employer or their spouse’s employer.

Guaranteed issue

Guaranteed issue means that you will not be denied insurance coverage based on your health status or pre-existing conditions. Similarly, guaranteed renewal means that you can renew your existing coverage without regard to your health status or use of services.

Health care cooperative

A health care cooperative is a nonprofit, member-run health insurance organization that provides insurance coverage to individuals and small businesses, and can operate at state, regional, and national levels.

Health care provider

Health care providers are doctors and other medical professionals who help identify, treat, and prevent illness or disability.

Health care sharing ministry

Health care sharing ministries, described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, are ministries in existence continuously since December 31, 1999. Members of the ministries share medical expenses among themselves without regard to the state of residence or employment.

Health coverage

Health coverage is the payment of benefits for your covered sickness or injury. This may include dental insurance, medical insurance, vision care, as well as other benefits. See health insurance.

Health information technology

Health information technology is a set of systems and technologies that enable health care organizations and providers to gather, store, and share information electronically.

Health insurance

Health insurance is an agreement by a carrier or public health program to pay some or all of your health care costs. See health coverage.

Health insurance marketplace

A health insurance marketplace, sometimes called an exchange, is a new way to get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Starting in 2014, every state will have a marketplace where you can compare and purchase health insurance plans, and find out if you are eligible for a premium tax credit or public programs to help pay for your health care.

Health maintenance organization (HMO)

A health maintenance organization (HMO) is a type of insurance plan in which the insurer contracts with or directly uses a network of physicians. If you enroll in an HMO plan, you will likely be asked to choose a primary care physician from within this network, and you may need a referral before seeing a specialist.

Health reimbursement account (HRA)

A health reimbursement account (HRA) is a tax-exempt account that can be used to pay for current or future health expenses. HRAs are established benefit plans funded by employer contributions.

Health savings account (HSA)

Health savings accounts (HSAs) are tax-exempt savings accounts that you can use to pay for health care expenses outside of your health plan. Contributions to your HSA can be made by anyone, including an employer, up to an annual maximum.

High-deductible health plan

A high-deductible health plan (HDHP) is a health insurance plan with lower premiums and higher deductibles than a traditional health plan. Enrollment in an HDHP allows you to sign up for a
health savings account.

High-risk pool

High-risk pools refer to state programs designed to provide health insurance to people who are considered medically uninsurable and are unable to buy coverage in the individual market.

Hospice services

Hospice services provide comfort and support for you and your family in the last stages of a terminal illness.

Household

A household includes you, your spouse or live-in partner, any children who live with you, and anyone you include on your federal income tax return. For the purposes of premium tax credits, a live-in partner is not included in the household.

Individual mandate

The individual mandate is the provision of the Affordable Care Act that requires most people to maintain health insurance coverage starting in 2014 or else pay a fee. See fee.

In-network benefits

In-network benefits are associated with a carrier's network of doctors, hospitals, clinics, and labs that accept allowed amounts as payment in full. You typically pay lower out-of-pocket costs when using these providers.

Inpatient care

Inpatient care is medical or surgical care that requires admission to a hospital or medical facility and usually includes an overnight stay.

In-person assistance

In-person assistance refers to individuals and organizations that provide free, unbiased help to people and small businesses looking for health coverage through a health insurance marketplace.

Legally present resident

A legally present resident is a person who is not a U.S. citizen and lives under legally recognized and lawfully recorded permanent residence as an immigrant.

Lifetime benefit maximum

A lifetime benefit maximum is the cap on the amount of money insurers will pay toward the cost of health care services over the lifetime of the insurance policy.

Long-term care

Long-term care is a set of services that enable people to live independently in the community, including home health and personal care, and services provided in institutional settings such as nursing homes.

Managed care organization (MCO)

Managed care organizations (MCOs), networks, or health plans are doctors, clinics, hospitals, pharmacies, and other providers who work together to care for their specific members' health care needs.

Mandatory benefits

Mandatory benefits are benefits or services—including mental health services, substance abuse treatment, and breast reconstruction following a mastectomy—that state-licensed health insurance organizations are required to cover in their health insurance plans.

Marketplace

A health insurance marketplace, sometimes called an exchange, is a new way to get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Starting in 2014, every state will have a marketplace where you can compare and purchase health insurance plans, and find out if you are eligible for a premium tax credit or public programs to help pay for your health care.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal and state program that helps with medical costs if you have limited income and resources, and also offers coverage for aging and disability programs. States design their own Medicaid programs within broad federal guidelines.

Medicaid waiver

A Medicaid waiver allows a state to continue receiving federal Medicaid matching funds even though it is no longer in compliance with certain requirements of the Medicaid statute.

Medical home

A medical home is a place where you can receive comprehensive primary care services, have an ongoing relationship with a primary care provider, have enhanced access to non-emergency care, and have access to linguistically and culturally appropriate care.

Medical loss ratio

The medical loss ratio is the percentage of premium dollars an insurance company spends on medical care and not on administrative costs or profits. Whenever an insurance company does not spend at least a certain percentage of the prior year's health insurance premium, it must deliver a medical loss ratio rebate.

Medical underwriting

Medical underwriting is the process of determining whether or not you get health care coverage based on your medical history.

Medicare

Medicare is a federal entitlement program that provides health insurance coverage to 45 million people, including people age 65 and older, and younger people with permanent disabilities, end-state renal disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D)

Medicare prescription drug coverage—also known as Medicare Part D—helps pay for prescription drugs for people with Medicare.

Metal level

Metal levels are the four levels of health insurance coverage (bronze, silver, gold, and platinum) available to individuals and groups under the Affordable Care Act. Each metal level must cover the same set of minimum essential health benefits, and it may contain additional benefits. Metal levels are based on how much you pay for your premium compared with how much you pay in
out-of-pocket costs.

Modified adjusted gross income (MAGI)

Modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is a definition of income from the tax system used to determine eligibility for Medicaid in all states, and for premium tax credits available to people buying insurance from exchanges.

Navigator

Navigators are staff members or volunteers at community partner organizations who are trained and certified to help educate you about health coverage plans. They can also assist you with the application and enrollment processes.

Network

Network facilities, providers, and suppliers contract with health insurance carriers or plans to provide health care services.

Non-preferred provider

Non-preferred providers are doctors or other medical professionals who do not have a contract with your carrier or plan. You will usually pay more to see a non-preferred provider.

Obamacare

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly referred to as Obamacare, is the health care reform law enacted in March 2010 that will start to take effect in January 2014. The ACA helps put you in control of selecting and managing your insurance coverage. It includes reforms such as guaranteed coverage regardless of your health status.

Open enrollment

Open enrollment is an annual period that usually occurs shortly before the beginning of a new plan year, during which you may enroll in a private health insurance plan for the first time, make changes to an existing plan, switch carriers, or cancel your coverage. For 2014, open enrollment goes from October 1, 2013, to March 31, 2014.

Out-of-network benefits

Out-of-network benefits are associated with non-contracted health care providers. Some plans offer out-of-network benefits, but you typically pay higher out-of-pocket costs for these services and may have to file a separate claim.

Out-of-pocket costs

Out-of-pocket costs are expenses for medical care that aren’t covered or paid by your insurance plan, including deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments, plus all other costs for services that aren't covered.

Out-of-pocket maximum (OOP max)

Out-of-pocket maximum (OOP max) is the maximum amount you will have to pay in
out-of-pocket costs within a policy period. carriers will begin paying 100% of health care costs for covered benefits after the out-of-pocket maximum has been reached.

Outpatient care

Outpatient care is medical or surgical care that does not include an overnight hospital stay.

Pay for performance

Pay for performance is a health care payment system in which providers receive incentives for meeting or exceeding quality.

Payment bundling

Payment bundling is a type of payment where providers or hospitals receive a single payment for all of the care given for an illness, rather than per service.

Penalty

Beginning in 2015, businesses with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) will need to offer employees health coverage or will have to pay a penalty. Learn more.

Plan year

A plan year is a consecutive 12-month period during which a qualified health plan (QHP) provides coverage for health benefits. A plan year may or may not be a calendar year.

Point of service (POS) plan

A point of service (POS) plan is a hybrid of HMO and PPO plans, in which you choose a primary care physician who refers patients to specialists. You may also receive care from non-network providers, but with higher out-of-pocket costs.

Portable coverage

Portable coverage allows people to get coverage as they move from job to job or in and out of employment. Also, see continuation coverage.

Pre-existing condition

A pre-existing condition is a health problem you had before the date that new health coverage starts.

Preferred provider organization (PPO)

A preferred provider organization (PPO) is a health plan that has contracts with a network of preferred providers. You don't need to select a primary care physician or get a referral to see other providers in the network.

Premium

A premium is the amount that you must pay for health coverage. It is usually paid monthly, quarterly, or yearly.

Premium tax credit

A premium tax credit is a new tax credit created by the Affordable Care Act that can lower your monthly premium costs. If you qualify, you can apply the premium tax credit right away—up to the maximum amount—or later when you file a federal income tax return. Get more information on tax credits.

Prescription drugs

Prescription drugs and medications require a prescription from medical professionals before they can be dispensed.

Preventive care

Preventive care consists of measures taken to prevent disease or injury.

Primary care provider

Primary care providers deliver or coordinate a range of health care services for their patients.

Private health insurance

Private health insurance is coverage by a health plan provided through an employer or union or purchased by an individual from a private health insurance company. The carrier will pay some or all of your health care costs, as long as you pay the monthly premium established under the plan.

Probationary period

For businesses, a probationary period is the time period—determined by the employer—that employees must wait before becoming eligible for group benefits. Effective January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act does not allow this period to be greater than 90 days.

Provider

A provider is any doctor or other medical professional, or a health care facility rendering services that are licensed, certified, or accredited under the state. This includes doctors, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, physician assistants, and more.

Provider payment rates

Provider payment rates are the total payment a provider, hospital, or community health center receives when they provide medical services to a patient.

Purchasing pool

A purchasing pool is where health insurance providers pool the health care risks of a group of people in order to make the costs predictable and manageable.

Qualified health plan (QHP)

A qualified health plan (QHP) is an insurance plan (certified by an exchange) that provides
essential health benefits and follows established limits on cost-sharing.

Qualifying dependent

Qualifying dependents include a legal spouse or same-sex registered domestic partner; biological children, stepchildren, children of domestic partners, or legally adopted children up to age 26; a child who is permanently incapable of self-support due to a physical or mental handicap before reaching age 26; or a child for whom the spouse/domestic partner is a legal guardian.

Quality rating(s)

Quality ratings are scores used to rate the performance of qualified health plans (QHPs) based on consumer feedback. Part of a four-star system (one star being poor quality, four being excellent), these ratings are designed to help you make informed decisions about health coverage.

Risk adjustment

The risk adjustment program under the Affordable Care Act—along with reinsurance and risk corridors—works to stabilize insurance premiums by providing payment to plans with sicker and higher-cost enrollees.

Safety net

Safety net providers are hospitals, doctors, and clinics that provide health care services to patients regardless of their ability to pay.

Section 125 premium-only plan (POP)

A Section 125 premium-only plan (POP) legally allows employees to pay their portion of medical insurance premiums and other benefit premiums using pre-tax or tax-free dollars.

Self-funded plan

A self-funded plan is a plan where the employer assumes direct financial responsibility for the costs of medical claims.

Small Business Health Care Tax Credit

The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit was created under the Affordable Care Act to help encourage small businesses with fewer than 25 employees to offer group coverage. Small businesses must purchase a plan through the health insurance marketplace, and cover at least 50% of the cost of health coverage for each employee. The average annual salary of all employees is less than $50,000.

State Continuation

State Continuation is a type of continuation coverage that allows you and your family to temporarily continue health coverage offered through an employer, even if you have changed or lost a job, or experienced a change in eligibility status.

Student health plan

A student health plan is a health plan offered by a college or university through an insurance company. These plans provide students with coverage as long as they meet certain criteria, such as credit hours.

Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC)

A Summary of Benefits and Coverage explains—in plain language—information about the benefits and coverage of a specific health plan. The summary should deliver consistent information from plan to plan, and must be provided to consumers by insurance companies and group health plans under the Affordable Care Act.

TEFRA

The Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) of 1982 makes Medicare a secondary payor option for employees who are 65 or above.

TRICARE

TRICARE is the federal health care program serving active and retired military service members and their families worldwide.

Unaffordable coverage (employers and employees)

Unaffordable coverage is a term that relates directly to employer coverage and the
premium tax credit. You may be able to qualify for help paying for health coverage if your employer coverage is considered unaffordable, meaning that you would have to pay more than 9.5% of your annual household income.

Uncompensated care

Uncompensated care refers to the cost of health care services that a doctor or hospital provides without ever receiving payment, typically because the patient was uninsured or under-insured and could not afford to pay.

Underinsured

Underinsured people have health insurance but face out-of-pocket health care costs or limits on benefits that may affect their ability to access or pay for health care services.

Urgent care

Urgent care is medical care reserved for an illness, injury, or condition serious enough that a person would seek care right away.

Veterans Affairs (VA)

The Department of Veterans Affairs provides patient care and federal benefits to veterans and their dependents.

Wellness plan

A wellness plan or program is an employment-based program to promote health and prevent chronic disease.

Workers' compensation insurance

Workers' compensation insurance pays for costs associated with disease or injury incurred on the job.

Young Adult Health Plan

A Young Adult Health Plan is designed to offer lower premiums in exchange for high deductibles and/or limited benefit packages.

Back To Top

Glosario de Términos

Acreditación

Para el mercado de seguros médicos, el término “acreditación” significa que un plan médico cumple con los estándares nacionales de calidad.

Afección preexistente

Una afección preexistente es un problema de salud que usted tenía antes de la fecha en que comienza la nueva cobertura médica.

Agente

Los agentes lo pueden ayudar con las complejidades del proceso de adquirir e inscribirse en una cobertura de seguro médico para que consiga el mejor precio en función de sus necesidades y situaciones específicas. Además, los agentes pueden desempeñarse como asesores cuando necesite ayuda con el procesamiento de reclamaciones. A los agentes se les paga una comisión por su trabajo, y están autorizados y controlados por los estados.

Ajuste de riesgos

El programa de ajuste de riesgos en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio —junto con los corredores de riesgo y reaseguros— cumple la función de estabilizar las primas de los seguros efectuando pagos a los planes en los que están inscritas personas más enfermas y con mayores costos.

Año del plan

Un año del plan es un período de 12 meses consecutivos durante el cual un plan de salud autorizado (QHP) proporciona cobertura para los beneficios médicos. El año del plan puede ser o no un año natural.

Apelación

En lo que respecta al mercado de seguros médicos, una apelación es una solicitud para que se reconsidere una decisión tomada acerca de su elegibilidad. Una apelación también puede ser una solicitud para que la prestadora reconsidere una decisión o queja formal.

Aprobación usando la historia clínica

La aprobación usando la historia clínica es el proceso de determinar si recibe o no cobertura de atención médica en función de su historia clínica.

Asistencia en persona

La asistencia en persona se refiere a la ayuda gratuita e imparcial que algunas personas y organizaciones les brindan a otras personas y pequeñas empresas en busca de una cobertura médica a través de un mercado de seguros médicos.

Asuntos de Veteranos (VA)

El Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos (Veterans Affairs, VA) proporciona atención del paciente y beneficios federales a veteranos y sus dependientes.

Atención ambulatoria

La atención ambulatoria es atención médica o quirúrgica que no incluye una estadía hospitalaria nocturna.

Atención de pacientes internados

La atención de pacientes internados se refiere a la atención médica o quirúrgica que requiere la internación en un hospital o centro médico y generalmente incluye una estadía nocturna.

Atención de urgencia

La atención de urgencia es atención médica reservada para una enfermedad, lesión o afección lo suficientemente grave para que la persona buscara atención de inmediato.

Atención no compensada

La atención no compensada se refiere al costo de los servicios de atención médica prestados por un médico u hospital sin recibir nunca el pago correspondiente, lo cual suele deberse a que el paciente no tenía un seguro o el seguro era insuficiente y no pudo afrontar el costo del servicio.

Ayuda de costos compartidos

La ayuda de costos compartidos reduce el monto máximo de gastos de su bolsillo y también puede reducir los montos de deducibles, copagos y coseguro de su plan.

Beneficiarios doblemente elegibles

Los beneficiarios doblemente elegibles son aquellas personas que son elegibles tanto para Medicare como para Medicaid.

Beneficios

El término “beneficios” se refiere a los servicios de atención médica que están cubiertos por su plan médico.

Beneficios de salud esenciales (EHB)

Los beneficios de salud esenciales (essential health benefits, EHB) son un conjunto de 10 categorías de servicios de atención médica definidas por la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio que deberán ser cubiertas por determinados planes a partir de 2014.

Beneficios dentro de la red

Los beneficios dentro de la red están relacionados con la red de médicos, hospitales, clínicas y laboratorios de una prestadora que aceptan cantidades autorizadas como pago total. Por lo general, usted paga gastos de su bolsillo más bajos al usar estos proveedores.

Beneficios fuera de la red

Los beneficios fuera de la red están relacionados con los proveedores de atención médica no contratados. Algunos planes ofrecen beneficios fuera de la red, pero generalmente los gastos de su bolsillo son más altos para estos servicios y posiblemente deba presentar una reclamación aparte.

Beneficios obligatorios

Los beneficios obligatorios se refieren a los beneficios o servicios —entre ellos, servicios de salud mental, tratamiento por abuso de sustancias y reconstrucción mamaria tras una mastectomía— que las organizaciones de seguro médico autorizadas por el estado deben cubrir en sus planes de seguro médico.

Bolsa de seguros

Una bolsa de seguros, que a veces se denomina mercado de seguros médicos, es una nueva forma de obtener un seguro médico en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio. A partir de 2014, cada estado tendrá un mercado de seguros en el que podrá comparar y adquirir planes de seguro médico, y averiguar si es elegible para recibir créditos fiscales o acceder a programas públicos que lo ayuden a pagar su atención médica.

Calificación comunitaria

La calificación comunitaria es un método para establecer las tarifas de las primas de los planes de seguro médico. Con la calificación comunitaria, a todas las personas inscritas en un plan de seguro se les cobra la misma prima, independientemente de su edad, sexo o estado de salud.

Calificación de la calidad

Las calificaciones de la calidad son puntajes que se utilizan para calificar el desempeño de los planes de salud autorizados (QHP) en función de los comentarios que hacen los consumidores. Como parte de un sistema de cuatro estrellas (en el que una estrella significa calidad deficiente y cuatro estrellas significa excelente), estas calificaciones están diseñadas para ayudarlo a tomar decisiones fundamentadas acerca de la cobertura médica.

calificaciones de la calidad

Las calificaciones de la calidad son puntajes que se utilizan para calificar el desempeño de los planes de salud autorizados (QHP) en función de los comentarios que hacen los consumidores. Como parte de un sistema de cuatro estrellas (en el que una estrella significa calidad deficiente y cuatro estrellas significa excelente), estas calificaciones están diseñadas para ayudarlo a tomar decisiones fundamentadas acerca de la cobertura médica.

Calificación de la experiencia

La calificación de la experiencia es un método de establecer primas para las pólizas de seguro médico en función del historial de reclamaciones de una persona o grupo.

Cantidad autorizada

La cantidad autorizada es el monto máximo que una compañía de seguros pagará por sus servicios de atención médica cubiertos. Si los servicios cuestan más que la cantidad autorizada, es posible que usted tenga que pagar la diferencia.

Capitación

La capitación es un método de pago de los servicios de atención médica en el que los proveedores reciben un pago fijo por cada persona en vez de recibir un pago en función de la cantidad de servicios prestados o los costos de los servicios.

Categoría de plan

Las categorías de plan son los cuatro niveles de cobertura de seguro médico (Bronce, Plata, Oro y Platino) que se ofrecen a personas y grupos en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio. Cada categoría de plan debe cubrir el mismo conjunto de beneficios de salud esenciales mínimos y pueden incluir beneficios adicionales. Las categorías de plan se basan en el monto que paga de prima en comparación con el monto que paga en concepto de gastos de su bolsillo.

Centros de salud calificados a nivel federal (FQHC)

Los centros de salud calificados a nivel federal (federally qualified health centers, FQHC), financiados por el gobierno federal, son proveedores de servicios de red de seguridad —como clínicas médicas comunitarias y centros de vivienda pública— que brindan servicios médicos independientemente de la capacidad de pago que tenga la persona.

Cobertura asequible (para personas y familias)

El término “cobertura asequible” se relaciona directamente con el mandato individual. Si tuviera que gastar más del 8 % de sus ingresos familiares en un seguro, no se aplicaría ninguna multa en caso de que decidiera quedarse sin seguro.

Cobertura de continuación

La cobertura de continuación le permite seguir teniendo su cobertura médica transitoriamente, incluso si ha cambiado de empleo o lo perdió, o si hubo algún cambio en su estado de elegibilidad. Consulte COBRA, continuación del estado y cobertura portátil.

Cobertura de Medicare para medicamentos recetados (Parte D)

La cobertura de Medicare para medicamentos recetados —también conocida como Medicare Parte D— ayuda a pagar los medicamentos recetados para las personas con Medicare.

Cobertura inasequible (empleadores y empleados)

El término “cobertura inasequible” se relaciona directamente con los términos “cobertura por el empleador” y “crédito fiscal de prima”. Es posible que usted pueda reunir los requisitos para recibir ayuda con el pago de la cobertura médica si la cobertura ofrecida por su empleador se considera inasequible, lo que significa que usted tendría que pagar más del 9,5 % de su ingreso familiar anual.

Cobertura médica

La cobertura médica es el pago de beneficios por enfermedades o lesiones contempladas en la cobertura. Puede incluir seguro dental, seguro médico, atención de la vista y otros beneficios. Consulte seguro médico.

Cobertura por el empleador

La cobertura por el empleador es la cobertura médica que una empresa le brinda a usted y, en ocasiones, a sus cónyuges e hijos.

Cobertura portátil

La cobertura portátil les permite a las personas obtener cobertura cuando cambian de trabajo o cuando están con o sin empleo. Consulte también cobertura de continuación.

COBRA

COBRA es un tipo de cobertura de continuación que le permite seguir teniendo la cobertura médica ofrecida a través de un empleador incluso si ha cambiado de empleo o lo perdió, o si hubo algún cambio en su estado de elegibilidad.

Combinación de pagos

La combinación de pagos es un tipo de pago mediante el cual los proveedores u hospitales reciben un pago único en concepto de toda la atención prestada por una enfermedad, en vez de que el pago sea por cada servicio.

Continuación del estado

La Continuación del estado es un tipo de cobertura de continuación que les permite a usted y su familia seguir teniendo transitoriamente la cobertura médica ofrecida a través de un empleador incluso si usted ha cambiado de empleo o lo perdió, o si hubo algún cambio en su estado de elegibilidad.

Contribución definida

Una contribución definida es un monto fijo en dólares que paga un empleador en concepto de prima para el empleado solo. Debe ser el mismo monto para todos los empleados.

Cooperativa de atención médica

Una cooperativa de atención médica es una organización de seguro médico sin fines de lucro, gestionada por los propios miembros, que proporciona cobertura de seguro a personas y pequeñas empresas, y que puede operar a nivel nacional, regional y estatal.

Copago

Los copagos son una forma de costo compartido que exigen algunos planes de seguro. El copago es un monto fijo en dólares (p. ej., $20) que tendría que pagar en caso de recibir un servicio de atención médica cubierto. Los montos de los copagos pueden variar según el tipo de servicio.

Corredor de seguros

Los agentes, a veces denominados corredores de seguros, lo pueden ayudar con las complejidades del proceso de adquirir e inscribirse en una cobertura de seguro médico para que consiga el mejor precio en función de sus necesidades y situaciones específicas. Además, los agentes pueden desempeñarse como asesores cuando necesite ayuda con el procesamiento de reclamaciones. A los agentes se les paga una comisión por su trabajo, y están autorizados y controlados por los estados.

Coseguro

El coseguro es una forma de costo compartido que exigen algunos planes de seguro. El coseguro es el porcentaje que tendría que pagar en caso de recibir un servicio de atención médica cubierto. Si su plan de seguro exige un coseguro del 20 %, usted pagaría el 20 % de la cantidad autorizada por un servicio de atención médica cubierto. La aseguradora pagaría el resto de la cantidad autorizada.

Costos compartidos

Los costos compartidos son cualquier gasto que asume usted cuando recibe servicios de atención médica cubiertos. Los costos compartidos pueden ser en forma de deducibles, copagos y coseguro. Estos costos son adicionales al monto que usted paga por la prima.

Crédito fiscal de atención médica para empleadores

El Crédito fiscal de atención médica para pequeñas empresas se creó en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio a modo de incentivo para que las pequeñas empresas con menos de 25 empleados ofrezcan cobertura grupal. Las pequeñas empresas deben adquirir un plan a través del mercado de seguros médicos y cubrir al menos el 50 % del costo de la cobertura médica para cada empleado. El salario anual promedio de todos los empleados es inferior a $50,000.

Crédito fiscal de atención médica para pequeñas empresas

El Crédito fiscal de atención médica para pequeñas empresas se creó en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio a modo de incentivo para que las pequeñas empresas con menos de 25 empleados ofrezcan cobertura grupal. Las pequeñas empresas deben adquirir un plan a través del mercado de seguros médicos y cubrir al menos el 50 % del costo de la cobertura médica para cada empleado. El salario anual promedio de todos los empleados es inferior a $50,000.

Crédito fiscal de prima

El crédito fiscal de prima es un nuevo crédito fiscal creado por la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio que puede reducir el costo de la prima mensual. Si usted reúne los requisitos, puede solicitar el crédito fiscal de prima de inmediato —hasta el monto máximo— o posteriormente cuando presente una declaración federal de impuestos sobre el ingreso. Obtenga más información sobre créditos fiscales.

Cuenta de ahorros para gastos médicos (HSA)

Las cuentas de ahorros para gastos médicos (health savings account, HSA) son cuentas de ahorros exentas de impuestos que se pueden utilizar para pagar los gastos de atención médica fuera del plan médico. Las contribuciones a la HSA pueden provenir de cualquier persona, incluido un empleador, y pueden ser hasta un monto máximo anual.

Cuenta de reembolso de gastos médicos (HRA)

Una cuenta de reembolso de gastos médicos (health reimbursement account, HRA) es una cuenta exenta de impuestos que puede utilizarse para pagar gastos médicos actuales o futuros. Las HRA son planes de beneficios establecidos que se financian con contribuciones de empleadores.

Cuidado a largo plazo

El cuidado a largo plazo es un conjunto de servicios que les permiten a las personas vivir en forma independiente en la comunidad, entre ellos, servicios de cuidado personal y atención médica domiciliaria, y un conjunto de servicios prestados en entornos institucionales, como las residencias para ancianos.

Cuidados preventivos

Los cuidados preventivos son medidas que se toman para prevenir enfermedades o lesiones.

Deducible

El deducible es una forma de costo compartido que exigen algunos planes de seguro. Es un monto fijo en dólares (p. ej., $500) que tendría que pagar por los servicios de atención médica cubiertos antes de que su plan de seguro comience a pagar los servicios. Posiblemente no se aplique el deducible a todos los servicios.

Deducible anual combinado

En una Cuenta de ahorros para gastos médicos (HSA), un deducible anual combinado es el monto total que debe pagar usted de su bolsillo antes de que el plan médico comience a cubrir los costos.

Dependiente

Por lo general los dependientes son miembros de la familia. A los fines fiscales, los dependientes son personas que reúnen los requisitos de exentos en su declaración de impuestos. A los fines del seguro, los dependientes son los hijos de hasta 26 años de edad, que pueden permanecer en el plan de seguro de sus padres.

Dependiente elegible

Los dependientes elegibles son los cónyuges, parejas de hecho o hijos que son elegibles para inscribirse en el mismo plan que tiene usted.

Dependiente que reúne los requisitos

Los dependientes que reúnen los requisitos incluyen a un cónyuge legal o una pareja de hecho registrada del mismo sexo; a los hijos biológicos, hijastros, hijos de parejas de hecho o hijos adoptados legalmente que tengan hasta 26 años; a un hijo que sea incapaz, en forma permanente, de su propia manutención debido a una deficiencia mental o física antes de cumplir los 26 años; o un hijo del cual el cónyuge o la pareja de hecho sea el tutor legal.

Discapacidad

Una discapacidad es una deficiencia o afección médica que limita la capacidad de realizar las actividades laborales o cotidianas normales. Las discapacidades pueden ser físicas, cognitivas, mentales, sensoriales, emocionales, relacionadas con el desarrollo o una combinación de estos.

Emisión garantizada

El término “emisión garantizada” significa que no se le denegará cobertura de seguro en función de su estado de salud ni de sus afecciones preexistentes. De modo similar, el término “renovación garantizada” quiere decir que usted puede renovar su cobertura actual independientemente de su estado de salud o uso de servicios.

Empleado elegible

Para las empresas, un empleado elegible es una persona que trabaja en un horario regular de 17.5 horas o más por semana en la fecha de entrada en vigencia de la cobertura.

Equivalente actuarial

El término “equivalente actuarial” se utiliza para describir a dos o más planes médicos que tienen el mismo valor actuarial. Los planes que son equivalentes actuariales probablemente tengan requisitos de costos compartidos y primas diferentes.

Exención de Medicaid

Una exención de Medicaid le permite a un estado seguir recibiendo fondos federales equivalentes de Medicaid aunque ya no esté cumpliendo determinados requisitos del estatuto de Medicaid.

Facturación del saldo

La facturación del saldo es la situación en la que un proveedor le factura la diferencia entre lo que este cobra y la cantidad autorizada. Por ejemplo, si el proveedor cobra $100 y la cantidad autorizada es $70, el proveedor le puede facturar los $30 restantes.

Fondo común de alto riesgo

Los fondos comunes de alto riesgo son programas estatales diseñados para proporcionar seguro médico a las personas que no se consideran médicamente asegurables y que no pueden adquirir una cobertura en el mercado individual.

Fondo común de compra

Un fondo común de compra es aquel en el que los proveedores de seguro médico agrupan los riesgos de la atención médica de un grupo de personas para hacer que los costos sean predecibles y administrables.

Gastos de su bolsillo

Los gastos de su bolsillo son gastos por atención médica que su plan de seguro no cubre ni paga, entre ellos, los deducibles, el coseguro y los copagos, más todos los demás gastos por servicios que no están cubiertos.

Gestión de casos

La gestión de casos es el proceso de coordinar la atención médica de pacientes con diagnósticos específicos o necesidades de atención médica importantes. Los gestores de casos pueden ser médicos, enfermeros o trabajadores sociales.

Gestión del cuidado para enfermedades crónicas

La gestión del cuidado para enfermedades crónicas es la coordinación de la atención médica y los servicios de apoyo para mejorar el estado de salud de pacientes con enfermedades crónicas, como la diabetes y el asma.

Grupo familiar

Su grupo familiar está compuesto por usted, su cónyuge o pareja de hecho, los hijos con los que conviva y toda persona que usted incluya en su declaración federal de impuestos sobre el ingreso. A los fines de los créditos fiscales de prima, las parejas de hecho no están incluidas en el grupo familiar.

Historia clínica electrónica

La historia clínica electrónica —o registro médico electrónico— es un registro computarizado sobre la información del paciente, que incluye datos médicos, demográficos y administrativos.

Hogar médico

Un hogar médico es un lugar en el que puede recibir servicios de atención primaria integrales, tener una relación continua con un proveedor de atención médica, tener un acceso más amplio a la atención que no sea de emergencia y tener acceso a una atención que sea adecuada en cuanto al aspecto cultural y del idioma.

Indio americano o nativo de Alaska

Un indio americano o nativo de Alaska es una persona que desciende de cualquiera de los pueblos originarios de América del Norte y del Sur (incluida América Central) y que mantiene una afiliación tribal o apego a su comunidad. Los indios americanos o nativos de Alaska son elegibles para recibir beneficios adicionales en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio.

Ingreso bruto ajustado modificado (MAGI)

El ingreso bruto ajustado modificado (modified adjusted gross income, MAGI) es una definición del ingreso tomada del sistema fiscal que se utiliza con el fin de determinar la elegibilidad para Medicaid en todos los estados y para los créditos fiscales de prima disponibles para las personas que adquieren un seguro a través de los mercados de seguros.

Ingresos familiares anuales

Para calcular sus ingresos familiares anuales, sume los sueldos, salarios, propinas, ingresos por trabajo autónomo, desempleo o jubilación, y pagos del Seguro Social correspondientes a todos los integrantes de su grupo familiar percibidos en un año natural.

Inscripción abierta

La inscripción abierta es un período anual que por lo general tiene lugar poco tiempo antes del comienzo de un nuevo año del plan. Durante este período, usted se puede inscribir en un plan de seguro médico privado por primera vez, hacer cambios a un plan existente, cambiar de prestadora o cancelar su cobertura. Para el año 2014, la inscripción abierta es desde el 1 de octubre de 2013 hasta el 31 de marzo de 2014.

Ley de Seguridad de los Ingresos de Jubilación de los Empleados (ERISA)

La Ley de Seguridad de los Ingresos de Jubilación de los Empleados (Employee Retirement Income Security Act, ERISA) es una ley federal que establece los estándares mínimos para los planes de jubilación. La ley ERISA rige para la mayoría de los planes de beneficios de los empleados, incluidos los planes que cubren beneficios de atención médica.

Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio (ACA)

La Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio (Affordable Care Act, ACA), comúnmente denominada Obamacare, es la ley de reforma de la atención médica que se aprobó en marzo de 2010 y que comenzará a tener vigencia en enero de 2014. La ACA ayuda a que usted tome el control de seleccionar y gestionar su cobertura de seguro. Incluye reformas tales como una cobertura garantizada independientemente de su estado de salud.

Límite anual

El límite anual es un tope en los beneficios que pagará su compañía de seguros en concepto de servicios en un año de cobertura. Se puede poner en el costo de un servicio o en la cantidad de visitas que realiza para recibir un servicio. Una vez que usted alcanza el límite anual, su prestadora no cubrirá los servicios adicionales hasta el comienzo del próximo año del plan.

Mandato del empleador

Para las empresas, el mandato del empleador es un requisito según el cual los empleadores deben ofrecer beneficios médicos y pagar una parte establecida del costo de dichos beneficios en nombre de sus empleados. Las empresas medianas con un equivalente de 50 a 99 empleados a tiempo completo tienen hasta 2016 para proporcionar una cobertura asequible. Las empresas más grandes deben ofrecer un seguro a por lo menos el 70 % de los trabajadores a tiempo completo en 2015 y al 95 % a partir de 2016.

Mandato individual

El mandato individual es la disposición de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio que exige que la mayoría de las personas mantengan una cobertura de seguro médico a partir del año 2014 o, de lo contrario, deberán pagar una multa. Consulte multa.

Medicaid

Medicaid es un programa estatal y federal que le ayuda a pagar los costos médicos si tiene recursos e ingresos limitados y que también ofrece cobertura para programas de discapacidad y de la tercera edad. Los estados diseñan sus propios programas Medicaid dentro de pautas federales amplias.

Medicamentos recetados

Los fármacos y medicamentos recetados requieren una receta de un profesional médico antes de ser dispensados.

Medicare

Medicare es un programa federal de derechos que proporciona cobertura de seguro médico a 45 millones de personas, entre las que se incluyen personas de 65 años o más, y personas más jóvenes con discapacidades permanentes, insuficiencia renal terminal y enfermedad de Lou Gehrig.

Mercado de seguros

Un mercado de seguros médicos es una nueva manera de obtener seguro médico en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio. A partir de 2014, cada estado tendrá un mercado de seguros en el que podrá comparar y adquirir planes de seguro médico, y averiguar si es elegible para recibir un crédito fiscal de prima o acceder a programas públicos que lo ayuden a pagar su atención médica.

Mercado de seguros médicos

Un mercado de seguros médicos es una nueva manera de obtener un seguro médico en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio. A partir de 2014, cada estado tendrá un mercado de seguros en el que podrá comparar y adquirir planes de seguro médico, y averiguar si es elegible para recibir un crédito fiscal de prima o acceder a programas públicos que lo ayuden a pagar su atención médica.

Ministerio de atención médica compartida

Los ministerios de atención médica compartida, que se describen en la sección 501(c)(3) del Código de Impuestos Internos, son ministerios que existen de manera continua desde el 31 de diciembre de 1999. Los miembros de los ministerios comparten los gastos médicos entre sí independientemente del estado de residencia o el empleo.

Monto máximo de gastos de su bolsillo (OOP max)

El monto máximo de gastos de su bolsillo (out‐of‐pocket maximum, OOP max) es el monto máximo que usted tendrá que pagar en concepto de gastos de su bolsillo en el plazo de la póliza. Las prestadoras comenzarán a pagar el 100 % de los costos de atención médica por los beneficios cubiertos después de que alcance el monto máximo de gastos de su bolsillo.

Monto máximo del beneficio de la póliza

El monto máximo del beneficio de la póliza es el tope en la cantidad de dinero que pagarán las aseguradoras en concepto del costo de los servicios de atención médica durante el plazo de vigencia de la póliza de seguro.

Multa

A partir del 1 de enero de 2014, si usted no tiene un plan médico que cumpla los requisitos de la cobertura esencial mínima, es posible que tenga que pagar una multa que aumenta todos los años: desde el 1 % del ingreso o $95 por adulto, el monto que sea mayor, en 2014 hasta el 2,5 % del ingreso o $695 por adulto en 2016. Consulte mandato individual.

Multa

A partir de 2015, las empresas con 50 o más empleados equivalentes a tiempo completo (FTE) deberán ofrecerles a sus empleados cobertura médica o, de lo contrario, tendrán que pagar una multa. Obtenga más información.

Navegador

Los navegadores son voluntarios o miembros del personal de organizaciones asociadas comunitarias que están capacitados y certificados para enseñarle acerca de los planes de cobertura médica. También lo pueden ayudar con el proceso de solicitud e inscripción.

Nivel de pobreza federal (FPL)

El nivel de pobreza federal (federal poverty level, FPL) es la definición operativa de pobreza que utiliza el gobierno federal para determinar quiénes tienen un ingreso por debajo de la línea de la pobreza y quiénes son elegibles para acceder a los programas públicos.

Obamacare

La Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio (Affordable Care Act, ACA), comúnmente denominada Obamacare, es la ley de reforma de la atención médica que se aprobó en marzo de 2010 y que comenzará a tener vigencia en enero de 2014. La ACA ayuda a que usted tome el control de seleccionar y gestionar su cobertura de seguro. Incluye reformas tales como una cobertura garantizada independientemente de su estado de salud.

Organización de atención administrada (MCO)

Las organizaciones de atención administrada (managed care organization, MCO), las redes o los planes médicos están compuestos por médicos, clínicas, hospitales, farmacias y otros proveedores que trabajan conjuntamente para satisfacer las necesidades de atención médica específicas de sus miembros.

Organización de atención coordinada (CCO)

Una organización de atención coordinada (coordinated care organization, CCO) es una red de proveedores de atención médica que han acordado trabajar juntos en sus comunidades locales para brindar servicios a pacientes de Medicaid.

Organización de proveedores exclusivos (EPO)

Una Organización de proveedores exclusivos (Exclusive Provider Organization, EPO) ofrece planes de atención administrada que cubren servicios únicamente si recurre a médicos, especialistas u hospitales dentro de la red del plan.

Organización de proveedores preferidos (PPO)

Una organización de proveedores preferidos (preferred provider organization, PPO) es un plan médico que tiene convenios con una red de proveedores preferidos. No es necesario que usted elija a un médico de atención primaria ni obtenga una remisión para consultar a otros proveedores de la red.

Organización para el mantenimiento de la salud (HMO)

Una organización para el mantenimiento de la salud (health maintenance organization, HMO) es un tipo de plan de seguro en el que la aseguradora firma contratos con médicos o utiliza directamente una red de médicos. Si usted se inscribe en un plan de una HMO, probablemente le pidan que elija un médico de atención primaria que forme parte de esa red, y es posible que necesite una remisión antes de poder consultar a un especialista.

Organización responsable por el cuidado de la salud (ACO)

Una organización responsable por el cuidado de la salud (accountable care organization, ACO) es un grupo de proveedores de atención médica que pueden ofrecerles a los pacientes de Medicare una atención coordinada de alta calidad. Cuando una ACO brinda atención de alta calidad y permite un gasto eficiente en atención médica, tiene una participación en los ahorros de Medicare.

Pago por desempeño

El pago por desempeño es un sistema de pago de atención médica en el que los proveedores reciben incentivos por cumplir o exceder las expectativas de calidad.

Pago por servicio

Pago por servicio es un método tradicional de pago de los servicios médicos por el cual se le paga a los médicos y hospitales por cada servicio que prestan.

Período de inscripción

Un período de inscripción es un plazo definido durante el cual se puede inscribir en una cobertura de seguro médico.

Período de prueba

Para las empresas, un período de prueba es el plazo —determinado por el empleador— que los empleados deben esperar antes de pasar a ser elegibles para los beneficios grupales. Con vigencia a partir del 1 de enero de 2014, la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio no permite que este período sea superior a 90 días.

Personas con seguro insuficiente

Las personas con seguro insuficiente tienen un seguro médico, pero afrontan gastos de atención médica de su bolsillo o límites en los beneficios que pueden afectar su capacidad de acceder a los servicios de atención médica o su capacidad de pago de dichos servicios.

Plan autofinanciado

Un plan autofinanciado es aquel en el que el empleador asume la responsabilidad económica directa de pagar los costos de reclamaciones médicas.

Plan catastrófico

Los planes catastróficos están diseñados para brindarle una red de seguridad ante una emergencia a fin de protegerlo contra gastos médicos considerables e inesperados. Si bien estos planes tienen primas mensuales más bajas, le exigen que pague el precio total para la mayoría de los servicios de atención médica hasta que alcanza el límite de gastos de su bolsillo. Los planes catastróficos se ofrecen solo a las personas menores de 30 años o a aquellas que tendrían que gastar más del 8 % de sus ingresos familiares en un plan de categoría Bronce.

Plan de bienestar

Un programa o plan de bienestar es un programa basado en el empleo para promover la salud y prevenir enfermedades crónicas.

Plan de prima exclusiva de la Sección 125 (POP)

El plan de prima exclusiva de la Sección 125 (premium-only plan, POP) les permite legalmente a los empleados pagar su parte de las primas del seguro médico y otras primas de los beneficios utilizando dinero no sujeto a impuestos o previo a la deducción impositiva.

Plan de punto de servicio (POS)

Un plan de punto de servicio (point of service, POS) es un híbrido de los planes de HMO y PPO en el que usted elige un médico de atención primaria que remite a los pacientes a especialistas. También puede recibir atención de proveedores fuera de la red, pero tendrá mayores gastos de su bolsillo.

Plan de salud autorizado (QHP)

Un plan de salud autorizado (qualified health plan, QHP) es un plan de seguro (certificado por un mercado de seguros) que proporciona beneficios de salud esenciales y cumple con límites establecidos sobre los costos compartidos.

Plan de salud con un deducible alto

Un plan de salud con un deducible alto (high-deductible health plan, HDHP) es un plan de seguro médico con primas más bajas y deducibles más altos que los de un plan médico tradicional. La inscripción en un HDHP le permite suscribirse a una cuenta de ahorros para gastos médicos.

Plan de salud dirigido por el consumidor

Un plan de salud dirigido por el consumidor ayuda a tener una mayor conciencia de los costos de atención médica y ofrece incentivos por tener en cuenta los costos al tomar decisiones relativas a la atención médica. Por lo general, estos planes médicos tienen un deducible alto que va acompañado de una cuenta de ahorros controlada por el consumidor.

Plan médico de derechos adquiridos

Un plan médico de derechos adquiridos es un plan médico grupal que fue creado —o una póliza de seguro médico individual que fue adquirida— el 23 de marzo de 2010 o antes de esa fecha. Los planes de derechos adquiridos están exentos de muchos de los cambios exigidos en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio.

Plan médico estudiantil

Un plan médico estudiantil es un tipo de plan médico ofrecido por una facultad o universidad a través de una compañía de seguros. Estos planes les brindan cobertura a los estudiantes siempre y cuando cumplan determinados requisitos, como horas de créditos.

Plan médico para adultos jóvenes

Un Plan médico para adultos jóvenes está diseñado para ofrecer primas más bajas a cambio de deducibles elevados o paquetes de beneficios limitados.

Plan médico para asociaciones

Un plan médico para asociaciones en un plan de seguro médico que se ofrece a miembros de una asociación. Según la manera en que esté estructurado el plan médico para asociaciones, podría estar ampliamente exento de las normas.

Plan operado y orientado al consumidor (CO-OP)

Un Plan operado y orientado al consumidor (Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan, CO-OP) es un plan de salud autorizado que es ofrecido por aseguradoras médicas privadas sin fines de lucro regidas por el cliente.

Porcentaje de ayuda médica federal (FMAP)

El Porcentaje de ayuda médica federal (Federal Medical Assistance Percentage, FMAP) es el término estatutario para la tasa equivalente federal de Medicaid. Este porcentaje es la porción de los costos de la administración o los servicios de Medicaid que cubre el gobierno federal.

Prestadora

Una prestadora es una empresa autorizada que proporciona cobertura de seguro médico o dental. A las prestadoras también se las denomina “aseguradoras” o “compañías de seguros”.

Prima

Una prima es el monto que debe pagar usted por la cobertura médica. Por lo general, se paga en forma mensual, trimestral o anual.

Programa de Beneficios de Salud para Empleados del Gobierno Federal (FEHBP)

El Programa de Beneficios de Salud para Empleados del Gobierno Federal (Federal Employee Health Benefits Program, FEHBP) proporciona seguro médico a los empleados del gobierno federal de los EE. UU. Los empleados federales pueden elegir un plan dentro de un menú de planes, entre ellos, planes de pago por servicio, planes con una opción de punto de servicio y planes de una organización para el mantenimiento de la salud.

Programa de derechos

Los programas de derechos se refieren a los programas federales, entre ellos, Medicare y Medicaid. Si usted es elegible para estos programas, tiene derecho a recibir beneficios.

Programa de Salud Básico (BHP)

En virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio, los estados tienen la opción de implementar un Programa de Salud Básico (Basic Health Program, BHP) que ofrecería cobertura de seguro asequible para residentes de bajos ingresos. El programa brindaría atención continua a las personas con ingresos que varían entre la elegibilidad para Medicaid y la elegibilidad para créditos fiscales para obtener cobertura a través del mercado de seguros médicos del estado.

Programa de Seguro Médico para Niños (CHIP)

El Programa de Seguro Médico para Niños (Children’s Health Insurance Program, CHIP) puede proporcionar cobertura médica a sus hijos si no son elegibles para Medicaid y si su familia no puede afrontar el costo de un seguro privado. El programa CHIP es administrado por cada estado y financiado conjuntamente por el gobierno federal y estatal.

Proveedor

Un proveedor es cualquier médico u otro profesional médico, o un centro de atención médica que prestan servicios y que están autorizados, certificado o acreditados por el estado. El término incluye, entre otros, a médicos, enfermeros practicantes, especialistas en enfermería clínica y asistentes de médicos.

Proveedor de atención médica

Los proveedores de atención médica son médicos y otros profesionales médicos que ayudan a identificar, tratar y prevenir enfermedades o discapacidades.

Proveedor de atención primaria

Los proveedores de atención primaria prestan o coordinan una serie de servicios de atención médica a sus pacientes.

Proveedor no preferido

Los proveedores no preferidos son médicos u otros profesionales médicos que no tienen un contrato con su prestadora o plan. Por lo general, pagará un monto mayor por consultar a proveedores no preferidos.

Red

Los proveedores, suministradores y establecimientos de la red firman convenios con planes o prestadoras de seguro médico para brindar servicios de atención médica.

Red de seguridad

Los proveedores de la red de seguridad son hospitales, médicos y clínicas que prestan servicios de atención médica a pacientes independientemente de su capacidad de pago.

Representante autorizado

Un representante autorizado es una persona —como un tutor o alguien con poder legal— que puede ayudar a tomar decisiones por usted, entre ellas, la inscripción en un plan de cobertura médica, el manejo de reclamaciones y pagos, y la firma de la solicitud en nombre de usted.

Residente con presencia legal

Un residente con presencia legal es aquella persona que no es un ciudadano estadounidense y que vive en calidad de inmigrante con residencia permanente registrada de manera legítima y reconocida legalmente.

Resumen de beneficios y cobertura (SBC)

Un Resumen de beneficios y cobertura (Summary of Benefits and Coverage, SBC) explica —con un lenguaje simple— la información acerca de los beneficios y la cobertura de un plan médico específico. El resumen debe incluir información coherente entre los planes y debe ser proporcionado a los consumidores por las compañías de seguros y los planes médicos grupales en virtud de la Ley del Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio.

Seguro de compensación por accidentes de trabajo

El seguro de compensación por accidentes de trabajo paga los costos asociados a enfermedades o lesiones sufridas en el trabajo.

Seguro médico

El seguro médico es un acuerdo asumido por una prestadora o un programa de salud pública para pagar una parte o la totalidad de los costos de atención médica. Consulte cobertura médica.

Seguro médico grupal

El seguro médico grupal se ofrece a un grupo de personas, como por ejemplo los empleados de una compañía. Una gran cantidad de estadounidenses cuentan con un seguro médico grupal a través de su propio empleador o el de su cónyuge.

Seguro médico privado

El seguro médico privado es la cobertura que ofrece un plan médico a través de un empleador o sindicato, o que adquiere una persona directamente de una compañía de seguro médico privado. La prestadora pagará una parte o la totalidad de los costos de atención médica siempre y cuando usted pague la prima mensual establecida en el plan.

Servicios de apoyo para enfermos terminales

Los servicios de apoyo para enfermos terminales les brindan apoyo y comodidad a usted y su familia en las últimas etapas de una enfermedad terminal.

Servicios de detección temprana y periódica, diagnóstico y tratamiento (EPSDT)

Los servicios de detección temprana y periódica, diagnóstico y tratamiento (early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment, EPSDT) son algunos de los servicios que los estados deben incluir en su paquete de beneficios básicos para todos los niños menores de 21 años que sean elegibles para Medicaid. Los servicios de EPSDT incluyen exámenes periódicos para detectar afecciones físicas y mentales, y problemas visuales, auditivos y dentales.

Servicios excluidos

Los servicios excluidos son servicios de atención médica que no están cubiertos por un plan de seguro médico en particular.

Servicios médicos preventivos

Los servicios médicos preventivos incluyen los exámenes de detección, chequeos y otros servicios que lo ayudan a mantenerse sano. Todos los planes médicos ofrecidos a través de un mercado de seguros médicos cubren los servicios médicos preventivos sin costo alguno para usted.

Tarifas de pago a proveedores

Las tarifas de pago a proveedores constituyen el pago total que recibe un proveedor, hospital o centro médico comunitario cuando presta servicios médicos a un paciente.

Tasa de participación de empleados

Para las empresas, la tasa de participación de empleados es el porcentaje de empleados que se inscriben en una cobertura médica ofrecida por un empleador.

Tasa de pérdidas médicas

La tasa de pérdidas médicas es el porcentaje del monto en dólares provenientes de las primas que gasta una compañía de seguros en atención médica y no en costos administrativos o ganancias. Cuando una compañía de seguros no gasta al menos un determinado porcentaje de la prima del seguro médico del año anterior, debe entregar un reembolso según la tasa de pérdidas médicas.

Tecnología de información para la salud

La tecnología de información para la salud es un conjunto de sistemas y tecnologías que les permiten a los proveedores y las organizaciones de atención médica recabar, almacenar y compartir información de manera electrónica.

TEFRA

La Ley de Responsabilidad Fiscal y de Equidad Tributaria (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act, TEFRA) de 1982 convierte a Medicare en una opción de pagador secundario para empleados que tengan 65 años o más.

Tribu indígena reconocida a nivel federal

Las tribus indígenas reconocidas a nivel federal son tribus de indios americanos y nativos de Alaska legalmente reconocidas por la Oficina de Asuntos Indígenas de los Estados Unidos (United States Bureau of Indian Affairs).

TRICARE

TRICARE es el programa federal de atención médica que brinda servicios a los miembros activos y retirados del servicio militar y a sus familias en todo el mundo.

Valor actuarial

Un valor actuarial es el porcentaje de los costos totales de atención médica que paga un plan de seguro médico. Por ejemplo, un plan con un valor actuarial del 70 % paga el 70 % de los costos de atención médica combinados de todas las personas inscritas en el plan. En ese caso, usted sería responsable de pagar el 30 % restante a través de una combinación de copagos, deducibles y coseguro.

Back To Top